The Complete Guidebook on Thermal Screening for Elevated Skin Temperature

Implementing a thermal camera screening solution can help limit the spread of infection. Get started with this free guidebook.

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Download the free guide to learn more.

Learn important details like:

  • How does screening for elevated skin temperature minimize the spread of infection?
  • Which screening methodology is best?
  • How can I create the best screening station for my facility?
  • How do I take accurate measurements?
  • What is the most efficient temperature screening workflow?
  • What is the best thermal camera for my application?
  • Where can I find educational resources or additional support?

Whether screening entry into large manufacturing operations, airports, or stadiums, implementing thermal cameras for elevated skin temperature screening can help create a safer, more secure environment for everyone.

Both newcomers and those familiar with thermal imaging technology will benefit from the best-practices outlined in The Complete Guidebook on Thermal Screening for Elevated Skin Temperature.

 

 

 

 


 

Can thermal cameras be used to detect a virus or an infection?

The quick answer to this question is no, but thermal imaging cameras can be used to detect elevated skin temperature. FLIR thermal cameras have a long history of being used in public spaces—such as airports, train terminals, businesses, factories, and concerts—as an effective tool to measure skin surface temperature and identify individuals with elevated skin temperature. 

When followed by a screening with a medical device, the use of an infrared camera as an adjunctive diagnostic tool may help contain or limit the spread of viral diseases such as bird flu, swine flu, or COVID-19.


What is elevated skin temperature screening?

Infrared thermography can detect elevated skin temperatures which may indicate the presence of a fever. When followed by a screening with a medical device, the use of an infrared camera as an adjunctive diagnostic tool may help contain or limit the spread of viral diseases such as bird flu, swine flu, or COVID-19.

Since the outbreak of serious flu strains such as H1N1, public health authorities have been looking for a reliable method to detect elevated body temperature as part of this disease prevention policy. The focus is specifically on elevated body temperature—or fever—because it is often a reliable indicator of many serious infections. Infrared thermography provides a fast, easy, contactless (non-invasive) method to initially screen individuals for signs of elevated skin temperature. Only those who appear to have an elevated skin temperature would then be screened with a medical device to confirm the presence of fever.

 


 

 


 

What are typical screening scenarios?

Infrastructure, Industrial Spaces, and Manufacturing
  • High-traffic areas with large throughput
  • Multiple entrances requiring screening stations
  • Need for self-service or minimally-assisted stations

 

Government Facilities
  • Medium to high-traffic areas
  • Security entrances require the addition of screening stations
  • Need for assisted screening that could be permanent, temporary, or portable

 

Small Business and Retail
  • Low-traffic areas with minimal throughput
  • Fewer entrances requiring screening stations
  • Need for easily-deployed self-service stations

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Where do you measure for accurate screening?

Human body temperature is a complex phenomenon. We are homeothermic, radiating heat through layers of skin to control our internal temperature. As a dynamic organ, skin constantly adjusts the optimum balance between the physiologic demands of the body and external environmental conditions.

While the forehead is easier to quickly screen, it is more susceptible to environmental interferences and more likely to generate measurement errors. Research has shown that the corner of the eye—the region medially adjacent to the inner canthus—provides a more accurate estimate of core body temperature than other areas of skin. This is because skin at the canthi is thin (decreasing insulating effects), is less exposed to environmental factors, and is directly over major arteries which increase blood flow and heat transfer.

 


 

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Ready to get started?

If you've read this far, you're well on your way towards screening for elevated skin temperature. Now that you've got the background, it's time to take things to the next level.

Download The Complete Guidebook on Thermal Screening for Elevated Skin Temperature and get on track to protect your front line from the spread of infection.